Revitalizing Atlantic Canada

Writing for Free Exchange allowed me to examine a multiplicity of issues facing Atlantic Canada and the following are some that I have found to be of paramount importance.

The most prominent issue in Atlantic Canada is slow economic growth, which has resulted in an enormous outflow of skill labourers, young professionals, and families who have left for British Columbia, Alberta, and Saskatchewan to find work. Economic growth rates in New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, and Prince Edward Island, for instance, have fallen below the national average of 2 per cent in 2013. Newfoundland and Labrador, which is currently booming due to oil production, is somewhat of an exception, however, declining revenues threaten to derail the province’s path to prosperity. In addition, the three Maritime Provinces experienced declining populations in 2013.

NL’s growth is largely attributable to strong oil and gas production, which has been growing in the province since the mid-2000s. The rest of Atlantic Canada could benefit from NL’s model and the region may need to look toward the oil and gas sector. New Brunswick currently boasts an opportunity to host the Energy East Pipeline and has a prospective shale gas industry. Other opportunities include increased cooperation or shared services between the three Maritime Provinces and exploring trade prospects with emerging markets.

Another problem facing the region, and the entire country, is unfunded liabilities. In other words, public sector pensions are a significant issue that plagues both federal and provincial government. This is where Atlantic Canada can lead: New Brunswick and Nova Scotia both made changes to their pension programs and the rest of Canada could learn from their progress.

In addition, Canada’s healthcare system requires additional consideration and policymakers must look into issues plaguing it. Through the Canada Health Transfer, the federal government allocates funds to the provinces to assist them with growing wait lists, quality assurance, and a number of other issues. However, progress has been futile. The federal government has given $41 billion in additional healthcare funding since 2004, yet, in 2010, Canada ranked last out of 11 countries in terms of wait times. This is why policymakers should consider alternatives to the status quo.

There are also serious democratic issues facing the country. The Senate remains unelected and unaccountable, and the Supreme Court’s recent ruling inscribed the current structure in stone. Its ruling does not need necessarily indicate defeat, though, and the Prime Minister, in addition to supporting premiers, must take the lead and ensure reform to the Upper Chamber.

While many Canadians may agree that these issues are of great importance, there must be action. We often criticize the political sphere for not dealing with these issues adequately, however, the truth is that we, as electors, must show that they are a priority or politicians will not give them due consideration. It is our duty to ensure that ideas, such as natural resource development, prudent fiscal management, and adequate healthcare, receive fair scrutiny, rather than arbitrarily dismissing them from the outset; it is our duty as citizens to place them on the political agenda.

Randy Kaye is a 2013-2014 Atlantic Institute for Market Studies’ Student Fellow. The views expressed are the opinion of the author and not necessarily the Institute

The Importance of Growth

Of the current issues facing the Canadian economy, the biggest of them depend on how Canada’s trade negotiations with other countries settle. The Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement (CETA) with Europe, for instance, creates enormous potential for Canada’s export-oriented industry to expand. In Atlantic Canada, however, there could be severely negative consequences if the provinces fail to take steps that bolster economic growth and attract new talent to the region. The new method of determining health transfer payments, which focuses on population and GDP, is just one illustration of how important economic and demographic development is in Eastern Canada.

Canada’s economic success is rooted in exports, and the export-industry, which is composed primarily of natural resource extraction, has an opportunity to not only supply other countries with raw materials and manufactured goods, but also value-added products. Reducing and eliminating barriers to trade with the European Union (EU) will likely benefit key economic sectors, such as energy, manufacturing, and seafood, and freer trade between Canada and Europe will encourage domestic economic activity, as it expands the market available to Canadian industry. The EU is currently Canada’s second-largest trading partner–behind the United States–and, in 2012, exports to Europe totalled $41 billion. However, it is critical that Canadian industry remains competitive in foreign markets and focuses on value-added products, as well as supplying factors of production. In fact, CETA eliminates protective barriers that currently prevent Canadian industry from exporting value-added products into Europe, and vice-versa, which levels the competition, in addition to providing an opportunity for Canadian-EU businesses to produce the most desirable products.

CETA also creates enormous potential for the Atlantic Provinces to expand the agriculture and seafood sectors into the EU, but they face significant demographic challenges that could restrict new prospects. In the last several years, Atlantic Canada’s population has declined and the average age has increased dramatically. In 2011, roughly 16 per cent of Atlantic Canada’s population was aged 65 or above, compared to 14.4 per cent of Canada’s entire population, and by 2036, Statistics Canada expects it to be around 29.1 per cent (compared to 23.7 nationally). Furthermore, Canada’s labour force increased by 1.1 per cent between 2012 and 2013, however, Atlantic Canada’s increased by half that amount, which is due in large part to an outflow of young individuals and families and an influx of retirees. As a result, the region is not equipped to attract large-scale industry, especially compared to British Columbia, Alberta, and Saskatchewan, and has contributed much less than other regions to Canada’s GDP in recent years. This is an important caveat, considering the federal government will begin calculating the Canada Health Transfer using population and GDP in 2018. If the Atlantic Provinces fail to generate economic growth and attract newcomers, they will receive less than other provinces to fund their healthcare systems, which will become more cumbersome in the future due to an ageing population and declining tax base.

In coming years, these two developments–freer trade and the new healthcare funding mechanism–will play a large role in determining Canada’s economic prosperity and the viability of its healthcare system. Canada’s export sector and healthcare system are rooted historically in the country’s history and it is unclear what changes will materialize because of modifications to them. In any case, the Atlantic Provinces need to take measures that bolster economic growth and attract new talent, both of which will allow them to take full advantage of CETA and other free trade agreements and create a sustainable source of funding for their healthcare systems.

Rachel Lowe is a 2013-2014 Atlantic Institute for Market Studies’ Student Fellow. The views expressed are the opinion of the author and not necessarily the Institute

Reforming Canadian Healthcare

The provinces are responsible for administering and delivering healthcare in Canada and while provincial jurisdiction may appear odd, it was not of major concern when the Fathers of Confederation ratified the British North America Act in 1867. Following several years of debate, however, the Judicial Committee of the Privy Council declared the provinces responsible for administering and provisioning healthcare. The federal government is responsible for public health, in addition to providing healthcare to certain groups, including First Nations, Inuit, military personnel, and federal inmates. It does provide funding to the provinces via the Canada Health Transfer, which is supposed to assist them with costs and ensure some degree of equivalency between provincial healthcare systems.

Former Saskatchewan Premier Tommy Douglas, widely recognized to be the “Father of Medicare,” fought ardently for the implementation of a publicly funded healthcare system. In 1962, one year after his departure from provincial politics, Saskatchewan began providing public healthcare and, shortly thereafter, so too did Alberta. Former Prime Minister John Diefenbaker, in 1958, announced the federal government would fund 50 per cent of provincial healthcare, and eight years later, then Prime Minister Lester B. Pearson ratified this motion.

As a result, Ottawa’s role in healthcare funding is controversial and has been a major policy issue in Canada. Indeed, without federal funding, there would be significant disparities among the provinces in terms of quality, yet, despite these concerns, healthcare innovation is provincial jurisdiction.

The debate over federal funding remerged following the expiration of the Canada Health Accord, established in 2004 under Paul Martin’s tenure as Prime Minister of Canada. It guaranteed six per cent annual increases in funding for healthcare and was supposed to help with deficiencies, such as high wait times. Stephen Harper’s government recently committed to a six per cent increase until 2017, after which the government will fund based on inflation-adjusted economic growth (although the level of funding will not fall below 3 per cent). This development has prompted critics to demand the government return to guaranteeing the six per cent increase, arguing that underfunding issues could worsen the system, and more worrying, allow new issues to emerge.

However, despite funding increases, very little has changed in terms of quality. Kelly McParland of the National Post, for instance, notes the lack of progress in reducing wait times. Moreover, citing the Health Council, he noted that homecare services for seniors are inadequate, primary care is insufficient, and prescription drugs are unaffordable. For example, as reported by the National Post, the federal government has given $41 billion in extra healthcare funding since 2004, yet in 2010 Canada ranked last of 11 countries in wait times.

McParland is not the sole critic. Indeed, there are several reports revealing the shortcomings of Canada’s healthcare system given the amount of money spent on it. Funding, therefore, is not necessarily the issue. There needs to be real reform of the Canadian healthcare system: Ottawa should retain its role, however, the provinces must consider new healthcare models as a means of strengthening their programs. Perhaps the first step ought to be reforming the Canada Health Act to be less restrictive in terms of delivery requirements. The Act requires that healthcare be publicly administered, greatly restricting any partnership with private entities. France, on the other hand, embraces a two-tier system, which typically performs highly in comparison to healthcare systems administered by other rich, democratic countries, in terms of both cost and outcome.

Randy Kaye is a 2013-2014 Atlantic Institute for Market Studies’ Student Fellow. The views expressed are the opinion of the author and not necessarily the Institute