Revitalizing Atlantic Canada

Writing for Free Exchange allowed me to examine a multiplicity of issues facing Atlantic Canada and the following are some that I have found to be of paramount importance.

The most prominent issue in Atlantic Canada is slow economic growth, which has resulted in an enormous outflow of skill labourers, young professionals, and families who have left for British Columbia, Alberta, and Saskatchewan to find work. Economic growth rates in New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, and Prince Edward Island, for instance, have fallen below the national average of 2 per cent in 2013. Newfoundland and Labrador, which is currently booming due to oil production, is somewhat of an exception, however, declining revenues threaten to derail the province’s path to prosperity. In addition, the three Maritime Provinces experienced declining populations in 2013.

NL’s growth is largely attributable to strong oil and gas production, which has been growing in the province since the mid-2000s. The rest of Atlantic Canada could benefit from NL’s model and the region may need to look toward the oil and gas sector. New Brunswick currently boasts an opportunity to host the Energy East Pipeline and has a prospective shale gas industry. Other opportunities include increased cooperation or shared services between the three Maritime Provinces and exploring trade prospects with emerging markets.

Another problem facing the region, and the entire country, is unfunded liabilities. In other words, public sector pensions are a significant issue that plagues both federal and provincial government. This is where Atlantic Canada can lead: New Brunswick and Nova Scotia both made changes to their pension programs and the rest of Canada could learn from their progress.

In addition, Canada’s healthcare system requires additional consideration and policymakers must look into issues plaguing it. Through the Canada Health Transfer, the federal government allocates funds to the provinces to assist them with growing wait lists, quality assurance, and a number of other issues. However, progress has been futile. The federal government has given $41 billion in additional healthcare funding since 2004, yet, in 2010, Canada ranked last out of 11 countries in terms of wait times. This is why policymakers should consider alternatives to the status quo.

There are also serious democratic issues facing the country. The Senate remains unelected and unaccountable, and the Supreme Court’s recent ruling inscribed the current structure in stone. Its ruling does not need necessarily indicate defeat, though, and the Prime Minister, in addition to supporting premiers, must take the lead and ensure reform to the Upper Chamber.

While many Canadians may agree that these issues are of great importance, there must be action. We often criticize the political sphere for not dealing with these issues adequately, however, the truth is that we, as electors, must show that they are a priority or politicians will not give them due consideration. It is our duty to ensure that ideas, such as natural resource development, prudent fiscal management, and adequate healthcare, receive fair scrutiny, rather than arbitrarily dismissing them from the outset; it is our duty as citizens to place them on the political agenda.

Randy Kaye is a 2013-2014 Atlantic Institute for Market Studies’ Student Fellow. The views expressed are the opinion of the author and not necessarily the Institute

Reforming Canadian Healthcare

The provinces are responsible for administering and delivering healthcare in Canada and while provincial jurisdiction may appear odd, it was not of major concern when the Fathers of Confederation ratified the British North America Act in 1867. Following several years of debate, however, the Judicial Committee of the Privy Council declared the provinces responsible for administering and provisioning healthcare. The federal government is responsible for public health, in addition to providing healthcare to certain groups, including First Nations, Inuit, military personnel, and federal inmates. It does provide funding to the provinces via the Canada Health Transfer, which is supposed to assist them with costs and ensure some degree of equivalency between provincial healthcare systems.

Former Saskatchewan Premier Tommy Douglas, widely recognized to be the “Father of Medicare,” fought ardently for the implementation of a publicly funded healthcare system. In 1962, one year after his departure from provincial politics, Saskatchewan began providing public healthcare and, shortly thereafter, so too did Alberta. Former Prime Minister John Diefenbaker, in 1958, announced the federal government would fund 50 per cent of provincial healthcare, and eight years later, then Prime Minister Lester B. Pearson ratified this motion.

As a result, Ottawa’s role in healthcare funding is controversial and has been a major policy issue in Canada. Indeed, without federal funding, there would be significant disparities among the provinces in terms of quality, yet, despite these concerns, healthcare innovation is provincial jurisdiction.

The debate over federal funding remerged following the expiration of the Canada Health Accord, established in 2004 under Paul Martin’s tenure as Prime Minister of Canada. It guaranteed six per cent annual increases in funding for healthcare and was supposed to help with deficiencies, such as high wait times. Stephen Harper’s government recently committed to a six per cent increase until 2017, after which the government will fund based on inflation-adjusted economic growth (although the level of funding will not fall below 3 per cent). This development has prompted critics to demand the government return to guaranteeing the six per cent increase, arguing that underfunding issues could worsen the system, and more worrying, allow new issues to emerge.

However, despite funding increases, very little has changed in terms of quality. Kelly McParland of the National Post, for instance, notes the lack of progress in reducing wait times. Moreover, citing the Health Council, he noted that homecare services for seniors are inadequate, primary care is insufficient, and prescription drugs are unaffordable. For example, as reported by the National Post, the federal government has given $41 billion in extra healthcare funding since 2004, yet in 2010 Canada ranked last of 11 countries in wait times.

McParland is not the sole critic. Indeed, there are several reports revealing the shortcomings of Canada’s healthcare system given the amount of money spent on it. Funding, therefore, is not necessarily the issue. There needs to be real reform of the Canadian healthcare system: Ottawa should retain its role, however, the provinces must consider new healthcare models as a means of strengthening their programs. Perhaps the first step ought to be reforming the Canada Health Act to be less restrictive in terms of delivery requirements. The Act requires that healthcare be publicly administered, greatly restricting any partnership with private entities. France, on the other hand, embraces a two-tier system, which typically performs highly in comparison to healthcare systems administered by other rich, democratic countries, in terms of both cost and outcome.

Randy Kaye is a 2013-2014 Atlantic Institute for Market Studies’ Student Fellow. The views expressed are the opinion of the author and not necessarily the Institute

Debating Revenue-neutral Carbon Taxes

During the 2008 federal election, proposals to implement a federal carbon tax were a major point of contention. Although Canadian voters ultimately rejected the plan, the issue of carbon pricing remains at the forefront of environmental discourse. This is for good reason: climate scientists, having shown conclusively that the earth is warming, now mostly concern themselves with both the size of the effect, in addition to its primary determinants.

In 2007, the Province of British Columbia (BC) successfully implemented a carbon tax with an important feature: revenue neutrality. The government expected to generate nearly $5 billion annually via carbon taxation and, accordingly, it would reduce personal and corporate taxes by an equal amount. This, in effect, slays one substantial criticism of a carbon tax, which is that it amounts to an additional overall tax burden on individuals, families, and firms. In British Columbia, the policy managed to deter purchases of gasoline and other carbon-intensive products by nearly 10 per cent relative to the rest of Canada, without burdening British Columbians with additional taxes.

Granted, those statistics only measure the carbon that British Columbians purchase in BC. They do not consider the stories of weekend lineups at American border towns where Canadians buy cheaper gas now that the price difference is large. This phenomenon may certainly account for some of the change, but it is quite difficult to imagine this effect being substantial. How much gas must a Vancouverite purchase to justify the two-hour drive, plus the wait in line?

Carbon pricing is also part of the discussion in Atlantic Canada.

In a series of papers published in 2009, University of New Brunswick economist Joe Rugger analyzes the environmental and taxation implications of a BC-styled revenue-neutral carbon tax in New Brunswick. The study found that a tax equivalent of 7 cents per liter on gasoline, applied to all forms of fossil fuel, would reduce carbon emissions in the province by roughly 7.5 per cent. This would occur primarily through higher electricity and heating bills, in addition to consumer purchases of gasoline and oil.

Changing carbon consumption occurs because of two opposing forces. First, making gasoline more expensive creates a “price effect” that causes people to shift their consumption away from gas and towards other things. This is what people refer to when they talk about nudging consumer behavior in a direction hoped to be socially beneficial. The second effect is due to the decreased tax burden–the “wealth effect.” Here, income goes up because of a smaller tax burden. People will then tend to consume, on average, slightly more of everything, including carbon. This works in the opposite direction of the price effect. In the case of BC, it became clear that the price effect was larger than the income effect and, therefore, total consumption was less than it would have otherwise been.

This highlights a confusing irony of carbon pricing policy–anything that makes people richer will tend to mean that they consume more carbon. People should continue to prosper; however, the primary objective is reducing carbon consumption. There are also distributional effects that occur based on the form and target of the tax cuts, as well as consumption behavior. This will be the topic of a second blog post.

In sum, Canadians are becoming more environmentally conscious and they recognize the need for not only fiscal, but also ecological, prudence. In this light, carbon-pricing policies are likely to remain in public discourse. By pairing the carbon tax with associated general tax cuts, rendering it revenue neutral, British Columbia’s experiment shows that it is at least possible to deter carbon consumption, while also minimizing harmful economic effects.

With the upcoming New Brunswick election in the fall of 2014, I would not be surprised if this issue arrives on the campaign trail. Considering recent curiosity in New Brunswick about local shale gas development, this policy has the potential to become quite the wedge issue.

Michael Craig is a 2013-2014 Atlantic Institute for Market Studies’ Student Fellow. The views expressed are the opinion of the author and not necessarily the Institute