The Energy-East Pipeline: An Opportunity to Turn a Province Around

New Brunswick has been making a rare appearance in the national editorial pages and the prospect of natural resource development through the Energy East Pipeline has been the principal topic of debate. Some observers argue that this could be the province’s opportunity to turn around its fortunes, but, as always, there is opposition citing environmental problems, among others.

That opposition generally stems from the argument that Canada must end its reliance on fossil fuels and fears of possible oil spills in the future.

While environmental concerns are particularly important in all natural resource development cases, it would be irresponsible for any government (of any political stripe) to ignore the possibility for serious economic gains. This fact becomes very clear from an examination of the state of the New Brunswick’s economy and the stimulus the project could provide.

It is no secret that New Brunswick has faced serious economic problems since the 2008 global economic meltdown. In September 2013, Statistics Canada reported that the province faced a 10.7% unemployment rate, which is one of the highest rates in the country. In conjunction with this report, CBC reported in the same month that the province lost approximately a net 2,944 individuals to other provinces in 2012.

Although these are only two indicators of economic performance, they tell a story that New Brunswick is facing a major economic problem.

This brings forward the next level of discussion: How can the Energy East Pipeline help build the New Brunswick economy?

TransCanada, the company who wishes to build the pipeline, employed Deloitte to explore the economic benefits of the pipeline for Canada. Deloitte found that the pipeline would add the following figures to New Brunswick’s economy:

  • $2,799 million to GDP
  • S266 million in tax revenues during construction (6 years)
  • $428 million in tax revenues during the operation phase (40 years)
  • 868 jobs in development (3 years)
  • 2866 jobs in construction (3 years)
  • 385 jobs per year in the operations phase (40 years)

These large amounts of tax revenues could mean balanced budgets for New Brunswick and extra money to spend in other areas of government, such as education and healthcare. Balanced budgets will also restore investor faith in New Brunswick.

The pipeline would create jobs that would not only reduce unemployment, but also increase consumption. That will lead to more economic spin-off, meaning that individuals will be able to afford more and, therefore, will buy more goods and services creating even more jobs in turn.

In conclusion, considering the state of the New Brunswick economy, it would be reckless for the government not to consider the opportunities that could be afforded to the province through natural resource development: the numbers show clearly that there is an extreme potential for growth and the Energy East Pipeline could have serious economic benefits for the province.

Randy Kaye is a 2013-2014 Atlantic Institute for Market Studies’ Student Fellow. The views expressed are the opinion of the author and not necessarily the Institute

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s